The Cross-Posting Guide for eBay and Poshmark Sellers

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eBay sucks.  Or at least that’s what my impression when I first started reselling and spent a ton of time on reselling forums rather than working on my business.

Now, five years later, I disagree.  Mostly.  eBay doesn’t suck.  In fact, it’s an incredible opportunity.  But the truth is, if you want to be successful on eBay, you have to learn how to dance with the beast.

There are tons of people who make a full-time living on eBay and Poshmark but, if you want to be one of them, you need to go about it in a calculated way or you will risk losing your entire business.

The problems with eBay:

  • You are not in control.  No matter how good you are, you are not in control of your eBay listings.  Last year eBay massively updated their site which results in thousands of sellers having listings disappear, have payment issues, and no sales.  Doing everything right and not having sales sucks.
  • Your Income could disappear overnight.  eBay has to look out for their own interests.  It’s understandable.  However, with so many people selling on the site it does happen that good sellers get banned or suspended.  We do our best to follow the rules and provide excellent customer service but we receive several negative feedback per year and have been suspended twice by eBay (VERO claims).  The idea that we could try to log in sometime and have our account missing is terrifying.
  • Every platform attracts a certain clientele. No matter how many users a platform has, there are going to be some items that are difficult to sell on that platform.  eBay is awesome but some things just don’t sell well because the people looking for them are only on Posh (and visa versa).

The additional problem with Poshmark:

  • Poshmark has all of the above issues (although they seem to break their site less often) with the additional problem of a much smaller user base.  Yes, you can make great money on Poshmark but the number of people making big money is much smaller than on eBay simply because there are fewer buyers to be had.

(read more about our platform comparison here)

So what is the best way to deal with these issues?  Well, it probably doesn’t come as any surprise that you can deal with these issues the same way that any business or financier deals with similar problems.  Diversification.  Or, in this case, utilizing multiple platforms to sell your items.

I recently came under a bit of fire on Instagram for voicing the opinion in one of my posts that reselling on eBay is not stable enough to be your only source of income.  Even though I’ve been reselling for the past 5 years (3 of those full-time) I stand by that statement.  It’s foolish to put all of your eggs in one basket.

So, in the interest of maximum profit while minimizing risk, how do we properly list on multiple platforms?

  1. Figure out if it’s worth your time.

In my opinion, pretty much everyone can find value in utilizing multiple platforms.  It provides the additional security of another revenue stream as well as giving you access to more eyeballs/wallets.  The only exception (in my opinion) is if you’re selling very high volume on any one platform.  If you are a large reselling business (as in, listing dozens or hundreds of items per day) then the cons of crossposting will likely outweigh the pros.

However, if you’re anything like the average eBay seller you’re leaving money on the table if you neglect other platforms.

  1. Decide on your platforms.

So you should just list your items on every platform out there, right?  After all, if two is good, 20 is better!  Nope.  As with most things, there is a point of diminishing returns when it comes to crossposting your items.  Utilizing too many platforms results in housekeeping headaches.  Not to mention a decrease in profits as you spend all of your time crossposting instead of getting new items up for sale.

So how many platforms is too many?  And which should you focus on?

In my opinion, every reseller should have a “main platform” where they list all of their inventory first.  Unless you sell a specific type of item, there are two real options here: eBay or Poshmark.  One might make a case for something like StockX or ThreadUp but the reality is that pretty much any other platform either has too small of a buyer base or is too limited in terms of what you can sell on the platform.

So once you’ve chosen between eBay and Poshmark, where else should you go?

Well, here are my thoughts.  If you sell on Poshmark, crosspost to eBay and/or Mercari.  If you sell on eBay, crosspost to Mercari.

Many people try to list items on smaller platforms such as Etsy or Depop but, unless you’re selling very niche items, you’re probably wasting your time.

For most people, having 3 platforms to sell on is the upper limit of what is useful.  At least, 3 online platforms.


If you’re a reseller, you should also learn the ins and outs of crossposting to a local sales platform such as Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist, or Offerup.  You have no fees, no shipping problems, and can sell larger/more expensive items without as many issues.

So, in summary, stick to 2-3 major platforms and familiarize yourself with 1-2 local selling options as well.

  1. Learn to manage your listings and inventory.

One of the major concerns of new sellers thinking about crossposting is, “What do I do if I sell the same item on multiple platforms?!  Well, it does happen.  It has happened to us many times.  But, just like every other challenge your business faces, you deal with it.  You cancel one of the orders and adjust your methods going forward to try and minimize the chances of it happening again.

The key to managing your inventory between sites is to end items on other sites as soon as possible when something sells.  We used to cherry-pick which of our eBay items we’d list on Mercari but we found that it is much easier to simply cross-post everything and know that we’ll have to go and an item on the other platform when it sells.

I typically don’t take the time to do this immediately when something sells but do it at the end of the day when I look back at orders.

The best tip I have for minimizing issues with double-selling is this: wait a week after listing an item to crosspost it.  If an item is going to sell quickly (like, within a couple of days) it greatly increases the chances of it selling on different platforms.  Not to mention the fact that you didn’t need to crosspost it because it was going to sell anyway.

I typically list something on eBay and wait 1-2 weeks to cross-post it to Mercari.

Unfortunately, there aren’t any solid inventory management systems that I would suggest to the average person that wants to sell on multiple platforms.  While there are options, the most cost-effective method is just to stay on top of things and do it yourself.

  1. How to crosspost effectively.

The best approach to crossposting from Poshmark or eBay is going to depend on the volume of items you’re listing/selling.  If you’re only sourcing and listing a couple of items per day the most effective option is for you to simply do things manually.  Keep your item pictures in your phone or on your camera until you cross-post them to another platform and then delete them.  The main drawback of this method is that it’s extremely time-consuming.  It turns the 5-10 minute it takes to list something into 15 minutes or so.

If you’re a full-time seller or a part-time hustler who takes your reselling seriously, you need to use a software to crosspost your items.

Using software allows you to complete a task that would ordinarily take hours in 1/10th the time.

For example, when we first started crossposting our eBay items onto Mercari I had over 1500 items that I wanted to move over.  I had to open each individual listing, save the pictures to a folder on my desktop, manually copy over the description, and then add in all the filters on Mercari.  Luckily there are now some well-priced options on the market that will do all of those things with the click of a single button.

We use ListPerfectly for all of our cross-posting.  It allows you to list to a dozen different platforms with just a couple of clicks.  It’s obviously not free, but it allows us to add several thousand dollars of sales per month and move inventory that would otherwise take forever to sell.

You can learn more about ListPerfectly here.  As an added bonus, use our code ResellingRevealed to get 30% off your first month and see if it’s a good fit for your business!

Summary

So, at the end of the day, yes, you should be crossposting.  Crossposting is a great way to diversify your income, increase your sales, and move some of that stale inventory that just might never move otherwise.

Just remember, no matter how many platforms you cross-post to, more listings mean more money! So get those things up for sale!

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